Quality care services

For our range of treatments please see the section below.

We also offer the follow additional services:

We offer a range of fertility treatments that will suit different people depending on your circumstances.

Learn more about the costs of these treatments.

Our most common treatments

In Vitro Fertilisation (IVF)

In Vitro Fertilisation (IVF)

IVF is suitable for:

  • Unexplained infertility
  • Tubal Damage
  • Male factor problems
  • Ovulation disorders
  • Older women

What is it?

IVF literally means fertilisation ‘in glass’ hence the familiar name of ‘test-tube baby ‘. Eggs are removed from the ovaries and fertilised by sperm in a laboratory dish and the resulting embryos

What does it involve?

  • For Her

IVF involves taking fertility drugs which are tailored to your individual needs. Your own hormone production is temporarily switched off and your ovaries are stimulated to produce more eggs than usual. The production of eggs is monitored by regular ultrasound scans. When eggs are ready to be released, you will have a minor operation to collect them (egg collection).

  • For Him

You will be asked to produce a sperm sample at the clinic on the day of egg collection. The sperm  are collected in a sample pot and after a short time are washed and spun at high speed to select the best sperm which are mixed with the eggs. If for any reason you are unlikely to be unable to produce a sample on the day, sperm may be frozen in advance.

What happens next?

The eggs are mixed with sperm in the laboratory and left to fertilise. After two or more days, one or two embryos are placed in your womb. Any good quality embryos may be frozen and stored for future use.

How successful is it?

Success rates depend on a number of factors, but most importantly the women’s age. The chance does not improve as each hurdle in the process is overcome; therefore it is helpful to know what the success rate is after egg collection and embryo transfer. We regularly publish success rates, so ask for our latest results.

Intra Cytoplasmic Sperm Injection (ICSI)

Intra Cytoplasmic Sperm Injection (ICSI)

Intra Cytoplasmic Sperm Injection (ICSI) is a technique that has been developed to assist fertilisation using very few sperm. If sperm quality is poor, either due to low numbers or because they do not swim very well, or because they are not able to penetrate the barriers surrounding the egg, then infertility can result. ICSI is used successfully to treat these conditions 

Who should have this treatment?

  • Men with very low numbers of sperm
  • Men with poor quality of sperm
  • Men who produce semen in which no sperm is present (see Surgical Sperm Retrieval)
  • Couples who have had previous failure to achieve fertilisation in routine IVF, or when very few eggs have fertilised following IVF

What specific tests may be needed prior to ICSI?

There are conditions associated with severe sperm problems. These include chromosomal abnormalities, cystic fibrosis or a hormonal imbalance. 

1. Chromosomes carry the genetic information from one generation to the next. They are responsible for determining not only what we look like, but making sure that everything works normally. We take blood from the man to check his chromosomes.

2. Cystic Fibrosis is a condition affecting the lungs and bowels and is also associated with defects that cause male infertility. The chance that a healthy person may carry a risk factor for this condition is 1 in 20. In men with some types of sperm problem, this risk is higher. If both you and your partner carry the risk factor then there is a 1 in 4 chance that your child may be affected. We take blood to screen for this condition.

3. A hormonal imbalance may be the cause of the abnormal sperm production. Blood is taken to check this.

What does it involve?

  • For Her

The cycle is the same as for IVF treatment.

  • For Him

This will depend upon whether a fresh or frozen sample is used, or surgical sperm retrieval is required. 

What happens next?

ISCI treatment involves injecting a single sperm directly into the centre of an egg to assist fertilisation. Once there, the nucleus from the sperm can fuse with the nucleus of the egg completing the normal fertilisation process. The  treated eggs are checked to see if fertilisation has occurred . After two or more days, one or two embryos are placed in your womb. Any other good quality embryos may be frozen and stored for your future use.

How successful is it?

As for IVF treatment, success rates depend on a number of factors, but most importantly, the women’s age. The chance does not improve as each hurdle in the treatment process is overcome, therefore it is helpful to know what the success rate is after egg collection and embryo transfer. We regularly publish success rates, so ask for our latest results.

Compensated egg-sharing

If you are not eligible for NHS funding, one way of helping to pay for IVF/ICSI treatment is through egg sharing. Egg sharing means you would get your treatment at a heavily subsidised price. In return, you agree to share your eggs with an anonymous recipient.

To be an egg sharer you must be generally fit and healthy, aged 18 to 35 years, non-smoker, free of any serious medical problem, disability, congenital or hereditary disease and not severely overweight for your height.

Treatment using donated eggs

The fertility tests that we do include tests to check on the ovarian egg store. You will be offered a follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) test, which measures the amount of FSH in a blood sample and in addition, you may be offered an anti-mullerian hormone (AMH) test to check on your store of eggs. If the egg store is low, then donor egg treatment may be an option for you. We have a specialist team to remove the complexities of donor egg treatment and guide you through a step-by-step and effective treatment pathway.

Egg donation may be suitable for women who:

  • Have had an early menopause
  • Have no ovaries or had them removed
  • Have had cancer treatment which has damaged the ovaries
  • Are producing few or low quality eggs
  • Have a high risk of passing on an inherited disorder

What does this treatment mean?

Eggs from a donor are fertilised with your partner’s or donor sperm and transferred to your womb.

Where do donors come from?

We recruit egg donors, but there is high demand, and you may need to wait up 18 months for a suitable donor who matches your characteristics. This may be longer depending on your specific requirements.

Alternatively, you may ask a friend or relative to donate their eggs, either directly to you or anonymously to someone else on the waiting list. You will then automatically go to the top of the waiting list for the next suitable anonymous donor.

Treatment using donor sperm

Donor sperm is needed for a variety of reasons:

  • Where a couple’s cause of infertility is due to a lack of sperm, or a very low sperm count, not suitable for ICSI
  • Where the male partner has a heritable disease and pre-implantation genetic diagnosis is not suitable
  • For single women and same sex couples.

Sperm donors are recruited from a wide range of backgrounds. They are required to be fit and healthy, with no family history of hereditary disease. Donors are screened for a variety of infectious conditions, including HIV and hepatitis, and for some genetic conditions, according to national guidelines.

As far as possible we try to match donor characteristics to the patient’s requirements - ethnicity, skin, hair/eye colour, height etc.

Donor sperm can be used in conjunction with artificial insemination, IVF or ICSI.

Single women and same sex couples

Sperm donors are recruited from a wide range of backgrounds. They are required to be fit and healthy, with no family history of hereditary disease. Donors are screened for a variety of infectious conditions, including HIV and hepatitis, and for some genetic conditions, according to national guidelines.

As far as possible we try to match donor characteristics to the patient’s requirements - ethnicity, skin, hair/eye colour, height etc.

Donor sperm can be used in conjunction with artificial insemination, IVF or ICSI.

Surrogacy

Surrogacy involves the transfer of embryos created using the eggs and sperm of a couple undergoing treatment (the commissioning couple), into the womb of another woman, the 'surrogate' and is carried out when for some reason a woman cannot carry a child herself.

The centre will consider surrogacy on a case-by-case basis. You would need to find your own surrogate as we cannot do this for you. Further information is available on application.

Less common treatments

Ovulation induction

Ovulation induction is a treatment for women who, for some reason, do not ovulate (release an egg) every month. By stimulating the ovaries with mild type fertility drugs and monitoring the effects with ultrasound scans, ovulation can be induced. The couple are then advised to have sexual intercourse over the next three days.

Artificial insemination

This is a technique that is used for couples with ‘unexplained’ infertility. The procedure is carefully coordinated with a women’s cycle. The correct day for insemination is determined by using mild fertility drugs and ultrasound scans to predict the day when ovulation will occur. The husband/partner is asked to produce a fresh semen sample on the day of treatment. This is prepared by the embryologist, which can take up to 2 hours. The women then attends clinic later on the same day. The insemination procedure itself is a simple one, similar to having a cervical smear test.

Surgical sperm retrieval

When there are no sperm in the ejaculate, sperm can sometimes still be recovered from the testicles by an operation. There are a variety of techniques:

  • PESA (Percutaneous Epididymal Sperm Aspiration- A fine needle is inserted into the epididymis (the sperm reservoir) at the upper area of the testicle and any sperm will be drawn through the needle into a syringe
  • TESA/TESE (Testicular Sperm Aspiration/ Extraction)- A fine needle is inserted into the testicle and tubules and sperm are drawn through the needle into a syringe.
  • Open Testicular Biopsy– if few or no sperm are obtained from the above procedures a biopsy (tissue sample) is taken from the testicle through a small incision. After the procedure 2-3 stitches are placed in the skin, these will dissolve after about 10 days.

These procedures are carried out either under local or general anaesthetic. The sperm can be used either for diagnosis, immediate treatment, or frozen for use in the future treatments. Sperm obtained from this procedure normally need to be used for ICSI treatment.